GED Testing

GED Close-outThe Testing Center at Emily Griffith Technical College is an official computerized General Educational Development, (GED) Pearson Vue testing center. There are four areas of the GED test: Reasoning Through Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. Many employers require a General Education Diploma or High School Diploma for employment in their company or organization.  Learn more about GED prep classes.

If you have questions during the registration process please call 1-877-392-6433 or email help@GEDtestingservice.com

*Please note if you started, but did not complete the test prior to 2014 your scores are no longer valid. You will need to follow the 2014 registration process.

GED Test Times

Only computerized GED Testing is available. GED Testing is available at the following times:

*Testing will only be available when EGTC is open. Please check the student calendar for closure dates. 

Day Time

Monday

9:00 a.m - 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday

9:00 a.m - 4:00 p.m.

Wednesday

9:00 a.m - 4:00 p.m.

Thursday

8:00 a.m - 2:00 p.m.

Friday

No Testing

Saturday

No Testing

You must register at www.GED.com for computerized testing. Testing schedule subject to change. 

GED Test Costs

Test Cost

Full Battery (Full Test)

$150.00

Individual Subtests (English and Spanish)

$37.50

GED En Espanol ESL Test

$37.50

Retests (English and Spanish)

$37.50

To register and pay for tests visit gedcomputer.com

Preparation and Practice Tests 

Official GED Practice Test “GED Ready” (opens in a new window)

 

2014 GED Free Practice Test (opens in a new window)

 

2014 GED Free Practice Test Companion:

Mathematical Reasoning (PDF file opens in a new window)

Science (PDF file opens in a new window)

Social Studies (PDF file opens in a new window)

Reasoning through Language Arts (PDF file opens in a new window)

 

2014 GED Sample Test Questions (opens in a new window)

 

2014 GED Computer-Based Test Tutorials (opens in a new window)

 

GED Test and Prep Market place (opens in a new window)

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) (opens in a new window)

 

GED Diplomas and Scores

How long does it take to get test scores?

Scores will be returned from the test within 3 hours of completion of each test module. During the first few weeks of 2014, GED Testing Service will be validating the Automated Scoring Engine (ASE). This will result in next-day scores for Reasoning Through Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies. However, when the ASE validation project is complete, students can expect a 3-hour score turnaround.

How many questions will be on each test?

The new test forms do not specify numbers of test questions – they are based on raw score points instead, since all items are no longer worth just one point each.  The final raw score point totals are as follows:  

  • Reasoning Through Language Arts – 65 raw score points
  • Mathematical Reasoning – 49 raw score points
  • Science – 40 raw score points
  • Social Studies – 44 raw score points.

Remember that scores from the 2014 GED® test are transformed to a common scaled score metric, to make the scores easier to use and interpret across the content areas.  The 2014 scale runs from 100 to 200, with 150 scaled score points as the Passing Standard for high school equivalency and 170 scaled score points as the GED® Score with Honors, reflective of readiness for career and college.

Is the evidence of college and career readiness based on the percentage of questions answered correctly?

Yes, roughly.

What are below passing, passing and honors GED scores?

Below Passing: 100 - 149

GED® Passing Score: 150 - 169

GED® Honors Score: 170 - 200

Is the 150 an average score needed for total passing or a minimum score required for passing of each test?

Minimum score.

In order to get your diploma once you have finished and passed all of the GED Tests, you must log in to www.diplomasender.com and register. You can also call 1-855-313-5799 with any questions. You will not get your diploma until you do this.

About the GED Test

The four tests on the 2014 GED:

Reasoning Through Language Arts

In alignment with career- and college-readiness standards, the GED® RLA assessment focuses on three essential groupings of skills:

1.     The ability to read closely

2.     The ability to write clearly

3.     The ability to edit and understand the use of standard written English in context

Because the strongest predictor of career and college readiness is the ability to read and comprehend complex texts, especially nonfiction, the RLA Test includes texts from both academic and workplace contexts. These texts reflect a range of complexity levels, in terms of ideas, syntax and style. The writing tasks, or Extended Response (ER) items, require test-takers to analyze given source texts and use evidence drawn from the text(s) to support their answers.

Given these priorities, the GED® RLA Test adheres to the following parameters: 

  • Seventy-five percent of the texts in the exam are informational texts (including nonfiction drawn from the science and the social studies as well as a range of texts from workplace contexts); 25 percent are literature.
  • The texts included in the test cover a range of text complexity, including texts at the career- and college-readiness level.
  • For texts in which comprehension hinges on vocabulary, the focus is on understanding words that appear frequently in texts from a wide variety of disciplines and, by their definition, are not unique to a particular discipline.
  • U.S. founding documents and the “the Great American Conversation” that followed are required texts for study and assessment.
  • The length of the texts included in the reading comprehension component of the test vary between 450 and 900 words.
  • Roughly 80 percent of the items are written to a Depth of Knowledge cognitive complexity level 2 or higher.
  • Reading and writing standards, such as those found in the Common Core State Standards, will also be measured in the GED® Social Studies Test, and the reading standards will be measured in the GED® Science Test.

READING COMPREHENSION ON THE GED® RLA TEST

The reading comprehension component of the GED® RLA Test is intended to measure two overarching reading standards that appear in the Common Core State Standards as Anchor Reading Standards 1 and 10, respectively:

1.     Determine the details of what is explicitly stated and make logical inferences or valid claims that square with textual evidence

2.     Read and respond to questions from a range of texts that are from the upper levels of complexity, including texts at the career- and college-ready level of text complexity.

These two high-level standards broadly govern all aspects of passage selection and item development in the reading comprehension component of the GED® RLA Test. As candidates are asked to determine the main idea, the point of view, the meaning of words and phrases, and other inferences and claims, they are asked to do so based on texts that span a range of complexity, including texts at the career- and college-readiness level.

WRITING ON THE GED® RLA TEST

The writing component integrates reading and writing into meaningful tasks that require candidates to support their written analysis with evidence drawn from a given source text(s) of appropriate complexity provided in the test. Also, given the growing demand and use of technology in all levels of postsecondary education and careers, the GED® test is administered by computer. Therefore, as in the reading component of the RLA Test, the following two high-level standards, which correspond with Common Core Anchor Standards 9 and 6 respectively, broadly govern all aspects of the writing tasks. 

1.     Draw relevant and sufficient evidence from a literary or information text to support analysis and reflection.

2.     Use technology to produce writing, demonstrating sufficient command of keyboarding skills.

Candidate responses are scored by a multi-trait rubric that focuses on three elements:

  • Trait 1: Analysis of Arguments and Use of Evidence
  • Trait 2: Development of Ideas and Structure
  • Trait 3: Clarity and Command of Standard English

LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS AND USAGE ON THE GED® RLA TEST

The language component of the GED® RLA Test measures a candidate’s ability to demonstrate command of a foundational set of conventions of standard English that have been identified as most important for career- and college-readiness by higher education instructors of post-secondary entry-level, credit-bearing composition courses. This core set of skills includes essential components of grammar, usage, capitalization and punctuation.

The GED® RLA Test includes editing items in an authentic context in which highlighted words or phrases appear in dropdown menus offering alternatives, which include a clear best choice alongside common errors or misconceptions. 

Mathematical Reasoning

The GED® Mathematical Reasoning Test focuses on two major content areas: quantitative problem solving and algebraic problem solving. 

Evidence that was used to inform the development of the Common Core State Standards shows that instructors of entry-level college mathematics value master of fundamentals over a broad, shallow coverage of topics. National remediation data are consistent with this perspective, suggesting that students with a shallow grasp of a wide range of topics are not as well prepared to succeed in postsecondary education and are more likely to need remediation in mathematics compared to those students who have a deeper understanding of more fundamental mathematical topics. Therefore, the GED® Mathematical Reasoning Test focuses on the fundamentals of mathematics in these two areas, striking a balance of deeper conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and the ability to apply these fundamentals in realistic situations. A variety of item types are used in the test, including multiple-choice, drag-and-drop, hot spot, and fill-in-the-blank.

The Common Core State Standards include Standards for Mathematical Practice, which describe the types of practices, or behaviors, in mathematics that are essential to the mastery of mathematical content. These standards form the basis of the GED® mathematical practice standards, which assess important mathematical proficiencies, including modeling, constructing and critiquing reasoning, and procedural fluency.

Given these priorities, the GED® Mathematical Reasoning Test adheres to the following parameters:

  • Approximately 45 percent of the content in the test focuses on quantitative problem solving, and approximately 55 percent focuses on algebraic problem solving.
  • The test includes items that test procedural skill and fluency as well as problem solving.
  • The contexts within which problem solving skills are measured were taken from both academic and workforce contexts.
  • Approximately 50 percent of the items are written to a Depth of Knowledge cognitive complexity level of 2.
  • Approximately 30 percent of the items are aligned to a Mathematical Practice standard in addition to a content indicator.
  • The statistics and data interpretation standards are also measured in the GED® Social Studies and Science Tests.
  • Candidates are provided with an on-screen calculator, the Texas Instruments TI-30XS Multiview scientific calculator, for use on most of the items on the 2014 GED® Mathematics Test.

MATHEMATICAL PRACTICES

In addition to the content-based indicators, the GED® mathematics test also focuses on reasoning skills, as embodied by the GED® Mathematical Practices. The mathematical practices framework is based upon two sets of standards: the Standards for Mathematical Practice found in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics; and the Process Standards found in the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

The content indicators and mathematical practices found in the GED® Mathematical Reasoning Assessment Targets, though related, cover different aspects of item content considerations. The content indicators focus on mathematical content, as typically seen in state standards frameworks and, to some extent, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. The indicators describe very specific skills and abilities of which test-takers are expected to demonstrate mastery. In contrast, the mathematical practices focus more on mathematical reasoning skills and modes of thinking mathematically. Most of these skills are non-content-specific, meaning that a mathematical practice indicator could be applied to items that cover a range of content domains (e.g. algebra, data analysis, number sense). The measurement of these skills is very much in keeping with the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice, which were created in order to “describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students” (Common Core State Standards for Mathematics [2010], p.6). The mathematical practices provide specifications for assessing real-world problem-solving skills in a mathematical context rather than requiring students only to memorize, recognize and apply a long list of mathematical algorithms. 

While we consider it crucial to assess both content and reasoning, it would be unrealistic to assert that each individual item could address both types of skills. To be sure, there are inter-related concepts to be found in the content indicators and the mathematical practices, especially in the areas of modeling and fluency, but not every item assessing a content indicator interacts seamlessly with a mathematical practice. Rather than force alignments, we seek to create items in which content and practice mesh well together. These items would primarily assess practice, with content serving as the context in which the practice is applied. Items of this type reflect the reasoning and problem-solving skills that are so critical to college and career readiness. Where this type of natural overlap between practice and content is not possible, other items assess the content indicators directly, thereby ensuring coverage of the full range of mathematical content on each test form.

Science

The GED® Science Test focuses on the fundamentals of science reasoning, striking a balance of deeper conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and the ability to apply these fundamentals in realistic situations. In order to stay true to this intention, each item on the Science Test is aligned to one science practice and one content topic.

The science practices can be described as skills that are key to scientific reasoning in both textual and quantitative contexts. The science practices are derived from important skills enumerated in the Common Core State Standards as well as in The National Research Council’s Framework for K-12 Science Education. 

The Science Test also focuses on three major content domains:

1.     Life science

2.     Physical science

3.     Earth and space science

The science content topics, which are drawn from these three domains, provide context for measuring a test-taker’s abilities to apply the reasoning skills described in the practices. The content topics focus on science that reflects both that which is taught in many high school-level science courses and that which is most relevant and useful for an adult population. To measure this content at a range of levels of complexity, several different item types are used in the test, including multiple choice, short answer, drag-and-drop, hot spot, and fill-in-the-blank. 

Given these priorities, the GED® Science Test adheres to the following parameters:

  • Approximately 40 percent of the test focuses on life science, roughly 40 percent focuses on physical science, and approximately 20 percent focuses on Earth and space science.
  • The test includes items that test textual analysis and understanding, data representation and inference skills, as well as problem solving with science content.
  • Each item on the Science Test is aligned to both one science practice and one content topic.
  • Each item is also aligned to one Depth of Knowledge level of cognitive complexity, based on the appropriate alignment to a science practice.
  • Approximately 80 percent of the items are written to a Depth of Knowledge level of 2 or higher.
  • The contexts within which problem solving skills are measured were taken from both academic and workforce contexts.
  • Approximately 50 percent of the items are presented in item scenarios, in which a single stimulus (which may be textual, graphic or a combination of both) serves to inform two to three items. The rest of the items are discrete.

CONTENT TOPICS

The science content topics describe key concepts that are widely taught in a variety of high school-level courses and are relevant to the lives of GED® test-takers. The content topics are designed to provide context for measuring the skills defined in the science practices.

The science practices maintain a close relationship with the science content topics. More specifically, the primary focus of the GED® Science Test continues to be the measurement of essential reasoning skills applied in a scientific context. However, test-takers should still be broadly and generally familiar with each of the basic concepts enumerated in the science content topics and subtopics, and they should be able to recognize and understand, in context, each of the terms listed there. Nevertheless, test-takers are not expected to have an in-depth and comprehensive knowledge of each subtopic. Rather, the stimuli about which each question pertains provides necessary details about scientific figures, formulas, and other key principles. For example, a question may include answer options and stimuli that contain specific terms drawn from the content subtopics; however, test-takers are never asked to formulate their own definition of a term without the item providing sufficient contextual support for such a task.

FOCUSING THEMES

These themes have been selected to ensure that the testcovers a wide range of important scientific topics, but they are also intended to function like a lens by drawing focus to a distinct subset of ideas within each content topic. That is, items from any of the three content domains of life science, physical science, and Earth and space science can pertain to one of these two themes, but content that falls outside the spheres of these themes do not appear on the GED® Science Test.

  • Human Health and Living Systems, the first focusing theme, pertains to material that is vital for the health and safety of all living things on the planet. Topics explored in this area of focus include the physical body and characteristics of humans and other living things. System of living organisms and related topics (e.g. diseases, evolution, and heredity) are also covered. This crosscutting concept also examines the mechanisms for how the human body works on chemical and physical levels. Within the domain of Earth and space science, topics are focused on how the environment affects living things and human society, as well as on how humans and other organisms affect the environment.
  • Energy and Related Systems, the second focusing theme, deals with a fundamental part of the universe. Topics in this area of focus cover sources of energy, transformations of energy, and uses of energy. Within the domain of life science, this theme is reflected in content exploring how energy flows through organisms and ecosystems. Similarly, the Earth’s geochemical systems are touched upon in Earth and space science. Topics related to how humans gain energy in their bodies and the results of the use of that energy are also relevant to this theme.

Social Studies

The GED® Social Studies Test focuses on the fundamentals of social studies reasoning, striking a balance of deeper conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and the ability to apply these fundamentals in realistic situations. In order to stay true to this intention, each item on the Social Studies Test is aligned to one social studies practice and one content topic. 

The social studies practices can be described as skills that are key to scientific reasoning in both textual and quantitative contexts. The practices come from important skills specified in the Common Core State Standards and other career- and college-readiness standards, as well as in National Standards for History.

The Social Studies Test will also focus on four major content domains:

1.     Civics and government

2.     United States history

3.     Economics

4.     Geography and the world

The social studies content topics, which are drawn from these four domains, provide context for measuring a test-taker’s ability to apply the reasoning skills described in the practices. The content topics focus on key concepts that reflect both that which is taught in many high-school-level social sciences courses and that which is most relevant and useful for an adult population.

To measure this content at a range of levels of complexity, several different item types are used in the test, including multiple choice, drag-and-drop, hot spot, and fill-in-the-blank. Additionally, the Social Studies Test features one extended response task that requires test-takers to analyze arguments and use evidence found within brief excerpts from primary and secondary source texts.

Given these priorities, the GED® Social Studies Test follows these specifications:

  • Approximately 50 percent focuses on civics and government, 20 percent focuses on United States history, 15 percent focuses on economics, and 15 percent focuses on geography and the world.
  • The test includes items that assess textual analysis and understanding, data representation and inference skills, and problem solving using social studies content.
  • Social Studies Test items align to one social studies practice and one content topic.
  • Each item aligns to one Depth of Knowledge level, based on appropriate alignment to social studies practice.
  • Approximately 80 percent of the test items are written to DOK level 2 or higher.
  • Problem-solving skills are measured in both academic and workplace contexts.
  • Approximately 50 percent of the test items are based on scenarios in which a single stimulus (textual, graphic or a combination of both) serves to inform two or three items; the remaining approximately 50 percent of the items are discrete stand-alone items.

SOCIAL STUDIES CONTENT TOPICS

The social studies content topics describe key concepts that are widely taught in a variety of high-school level social studies courses and are relevant to the lives of GED® test-takers. They focus, in particular, on American civics and government. They are designed to provide context for measuring the skills defined in the social studies practices section of this document. 

The content topics for the Social Studies Test focus on two main themes, each applied across the four domains in the social studies arena (i.e. civics and government, U.S. history, economics, and geography and the world). These themes have been selected to ensure that the test covers a wide range of important concepts and ideas in social studies, but they are also intended to function like a lens to draw focus to a distinct subset of ideas within each content topic. Content that falls outside the parameters of these themes are not included in the GED® Social Studies Test.

  • Development of Modern Liberties and Democracy, the first theme, explores the development of current ideas about democracy as well as human and civil rights from ancient civilizations to the present. It examines contemporary thinking, policies and structures, major events that have shaped our democratic values, and major thinkers who contributed to American ideas of democratic government.
  • Dynamic Responses in Societal Systems, the second theme, explores how the systems, structures and policies that people have created respond to each other, conditions, and events. For example, societies and civilizations have developed and changed in response to particular geographic features and natural events. National economies respond to both governmental policies and natural laws of economics—such as supply and demand—around which policies are built. Similarly, countries respond to both internal and external changes and challenges in ways that are beyond the ability of any one person to control.

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Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Wednesday, October 29, 2014
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Time: 9:00am to 10:00am

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